Higher Education

Professor Katz’s declaration | Power Line – Politics Article

Do you recall the anti-George W. Bush petition that generated scads of mock signatories such as Hugh G. Reckshun? James Taranto delighted in chronicling the signatures daily in his online Best of the Web column for the Wall Street Journal. More recently, The Open Letter from Yale Law Students, Alumni, and Educators Regarding Brett Kavanaugh attracted one such signatory: “Charles U Farley, YLS ‘04.” Now, Charles Glasser observed, that’s a lawyer’s lawyer. This week Paul Mirengoff spotted at least one…

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Princeton faculty letter demands end to academic freedom – Politics Article

On July 4, a group of more than 400 Princeton faculty members and (from the look of it) hangers-on sent a letter to the university’s president and other leaders on the subject of “anti-black racism.” After a few perfunctory and unsupported allegations about this phenomenon, the authors proceed to the business at hand. They present several dozen “demands.” Each demand seems more outlandish than the last until, finally, we get to the apogee: Thus, as Zaid Jilani tweeted, the faculty…

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Holloway’s way | Power Line – Politics Article

Jonathan Holloway is the new president of Rutgers University. Insofar as one can tell from the quotes in Amanda Hoover’s NJ.com profile of Holloway — “Rutgers is named for a slave owner, but school’s first Black president says the name will stay” — his views resemble those of a conventional academic bureaucrat except in one respect. Holloway asserts that the university’s name isn’t up for changing even though it honors a man who owned slaves (more here). Perhaps it is…

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The problems with implicit bias training – Politics Article

Last week, Scott reported that Dartmouth will impose mandatory “implicit bias” training on all students, faculty, and staff. Even Dartmouth’s board of trustees “has committed itself to participating in the training.” I don’t doubt that there is such a thing as implicit bias. The bias can be against Blacks, Whites, Latinos, Jews, etc. It can also be against America, although these days much of the anti-American bias on display is pretty damn explicit. But does what we know about implicit…

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Nightmare at Oberlin | Power Line – Politics Article

Things haven’t gone well for Oberlin College in court recently. First, it was found liable for defaming Gibson’s Bakery. After the bakery’s owner tried to stop a black student from shoplifting, the Oberlin student senate condemned the bakery as racist and called for a boycott of its products, which Oberlin stopped purchasing for a time. A jury awarded the Gibson family $44 million in damages (reduced to $33 million by operation of Ohio law). The case is on appeal to…

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Woodrow Wilson: His Redeeming Characteristics – Politics Article

President Woodrow Wilson throws out the first pitch on opening day, 1916. (Library of Congress) Ross Douthat criticizes Princeton’s decision to change the name of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. The school, he writes, “wasn’t named for Wilson to honor him for being a segregationist. It was named for him because he helped create precisely the institutions that the school exists to staff — our domestic administrative state and our global foreign policy apparatus — and…

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Will top black athletes opt for HBCUs? Will top black students? – Politics Article

Trevor Keels will be a senior guard next season on the powerhouse high school basketball team Paul VI in Fairfax, Virginia. Keels is a five-star recruit and ranks among the top 25 high school players in the class of 2021. Reportedly, he’s being recruited by the likes of Duke, Virginia, Villanova, and Michigan. The Washington area high school league Keels participates in has sent players to all of these schools in recent years (counting 2020). I’ve seen all of them…

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The Colleges That Can Spur America’s COVID-19 Recovery – Politics Article

iStock In Washington, D.C., debates around higher education tend to focus on the Harvards and Yales of the world, forgetting that elite schools don’t represent the kind of institutions that most students attend. Too often absent from these conversations are higher education’s true workhorses: so-called “regional” public universities. While the Department of Education offers no official definition of these institutions, they basically occupy the middle space between community colleges and flagship major research universities. One analysis by Inside Higher Education tallies…

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Rename Yale Now | Power Line – Politics Article

Some mischievous benefactor of humanity has purchased a full-page ad in today’s New York Times to publish Roger Kimball’s June 22 American Greatness column “Canceling Yale.” The ad with Roger’s column appears in today’s Times under the headline Rename Yale Now. I have posted a screenshot of the text below. I’m sorry it’s not more readable. I just want you to get some idea of the nature of the thing. Roger’s column opens (links omitted): I see that #CancelYale is…

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Princeton’s president isn’t fooling the Black Justice League – Politics Article

I doubt that I agree with the Black Justice League about much. However, I agree with some of what it argues in this statement in response to the removal of Woodrow Wilson’s name from Princeton’s school of public policy. I agree that: 1. The Wilson-related name change is a “symbolic gesture” that does not address Princeton’s “racist status quo”;2. “Diversity training” would not accomplish anything;3. Princeton’s actions are a “cosmetic change”;4. Princeton has a racist past and a racist present;5.…

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Cancellation in the first person – Politics Article

In its forthcoming July/August issue, Commentary features the first-person account of our own Steve Hayward telling the story of his cancellation by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Steve’s memoir/essay is “How I Ran Afoul of Campus Cancel Culture.” As always, Steve wears his learning lightly, but his characteristic humor is absent from this somber and infuriating account. Come for the farcically disgraceful story, stay for Steve’s telling selection of quotes from Goldman School founding dean Aaron…

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The Lost History of Western Civilization Is Coming – Politics Article

A cauldron set alight with the Olympic Flame is pictured atop the Acropolis hill as the Parthenon temple is seen in the background in Athens, Greece, April 26, 2016. (Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters) Thirty-two years ago, this country was divided by Stanford University’s decision to ditch its Western Civilization requirement in favor of a multicultural alternative. Claims that Stanford had built a racist curriculum around the likes of Plato, Aristotle, the Bible, Marx, Freud, Voltaire, and Darwin made for a sensational cultural…

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Want Some Good Books About Higher Ed for Christmas? – Politics Article

On Friday, I caught a little bit of flack for calling Star Wars fans “nerds” on Fox News. This was, of course, not surprising to me. I knew my comments would piss some people off — after all, how could I forget receiving a barrage of death threats over joking about the franchise back in 2015. Now, … Read… This is only a snippet of a Politics Article written by George Leef Read Full Political Article

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Janek Wasserman & Austrian School of Economics — Can’t ‘Progressives’ Discuss Without Impugning Motives? – Politics Article

(Jonathan Drake/Reuters) Increasingly, no. Remember Duke historian Nancy MacLean’s odious book Democracy in Chains, a disreputable hatchet job on James Buchanan and public choice theory generally. Rather than trying to come to grips with Buchanan’s thinking and its implications — chiefly that if you believe government will solve problems, you’d better think again because government officials have their own self-interested agendas — MacLean manufactured a sleazy case that he was a racist who just wanted to create an excuse for opposing…

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Fish out of water | Power Line – Politics Article

Once upon a time, Stanley Fish was a state of the art radical professor — “a scrappy advocate of multiculturalism, affirmative-action hiring quotas, campus speech codes and openly subversive strains of post-structuralist critical theory,” to quote the view attributed to his critics by the New York Times. Fish transformed the Duke University English department into a bastion of “deconstructionism” — the view that literary texts acquire meaning only as a result of the reader’s interpretive acts and that it is…

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